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Today in Labor History

Oct. 27, 1904
The New York City subway, the first rapid-transit system in America, opens. More than 100 workers died during the construction of the first 13 miles of tunnels and track.
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 LOCAL UNION UPDATE
General Membership Meeting scheduled for Sunday, November 8, 2020 is cancelled
Please click here to view the Meeting Cancellation Notice and
Local Union and Benefit Funds Offices schedules.

Local and National Union News

Faced with new spikes in coronavirus, November members meeting is cancelled
Oct. 26, 2020  |  Much as we'd all like to get back together again at our monthly general membership meetings, the coronavirus pandemic continues to pose a serious threat. In the interest of the well-being of our members, retirees, and staff, we made the decision to cancel the meeting scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 8th. Please read this important Local Union 992 notice pertaining to this decision.

Download your Teamster ‘I Voted’ Facebook frame
Oct. 26, 2020  |  Let everyone know that you’re a Teamster and you voted! Download these frames as your profile picture on Facebook to show that Teamsters are making our voices heard at the polls in this historic election.

Early voting in Maryland begins Monday. Here’s what to know.
Oct. 26, 2020  | The end is in sight. With eight days left in the U.S. presidential campaign, early in-person voting begins today in Maryland. In an election reshaped by the coronavirus pandemic and colored with uncertainty, more than 800,000 Maryland voters have already submitted ballots by mail or drop box. Here are answers to some commonly asked questions. Voting in Pennsylvania. Voting in West Virginia.

Hoffa: Biden-Harris will improve lives of workers
Oct. 22, 2020  | 2020 is a year for the record books. A global pandemic has wreaked havoc not only with the health of Americans, but also on their wallets. Tens of millions of Americans have lost their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic, and millions are still out of work. But if we are honest with ourselves, these tumultuous times did not start back in March. Working families all over the country have been struggling for years with a federal government that’s prioritized the corporate class over the working class. That’s why we’ve seen a curtailing of union rights and a lack of attention to pension security issues. We need a change at the top… Continue reading here

Older news items are posted at 992 News.

Elsewhere in the News
Increasing the Minimum Wage Would Help, Not Hurt, the Economy
Oct. 26, 2020 | WAGES | The minimum wage in the United States hasn’t budged in 11 years. Whether it should was a hotly contested question during Thursday’s final presidential debate. President Donald Trump asserted that increasing the minimum wage would crush small businesses, many of which are already struggling as a result of the pandemic, arguing that the decision should be left to the states. Democratic nominee Joe Biden repeated his campaign pledge to raise the minimum wage from its current $7.25 to $15. Establishing a $15 wage floor has been a long-term goal of union-backed advocacy groups, which began putting pressure on big companies like McDonald’s and Walmart to pay workers $15 an hour in 2012… NBC News
In Case You Missed It

  • COVID-19 news updates for Oct. 21, 2020
  • The Fight for $15 is more important than ever
  • Why I’m voting against hate
  • Famous protests in US history and their impacts
  • Teamsters call for zero emissions in private waste industry
  • Laid-off Disney Teamsters work as volunteers at food bank
  • Baltimore Teachers Union urges parents to boycott school reopening
  • American Postal Workers Union continues fight to save USPS
  • Labor prepares for a last-minute general strike if Trump tries to steal the election
  • The Baltimore Sun’s Maryland Voter Guide 2020

How to Boost Unions’ Power? Sectoral Bargaining.
Oct. 22, 2020 | LABOR UNIONS | In 1980 about a tenth of work­ers were cov­ered by mul­ti-employ­er agree­ments that set indus­try-wide stan­dards, espe­cial­ly work­ers in steel, auto, truck­ing, con­struc­tion and mining. What hap­pened? An onslaught of dereg­u­la­tion and anti-union attacks reversed those gains. Unions sim­ply lack the pow­er and mem­ber­ship to orga­nize entire sec­tors and indus­tries. Sec­toral or mul­ti-employ­er bar­gain­ing does exist — in heav­i­ly union­ized indus­tries, like hos­pi­tal­i­ty — but, most­ly, unions nego­ti­ate wages and improve con­di­tions at one indi­vid­ual work­site at a time. The Pro­tect­ing the Right to Orga­nize Act would remove some of the major dif­fi­cul­ties faced by union orga­niz­ers and passed in the House ear­li­er this year. It now waits in the Sen­ate. Like so much else, its chance of becom­ing law any time soon great­ly depends on who wins in Novem­ber. If it does pass, unions can begin the process of rebuild­ing their bar­gain­ing pow­er from the bot­tom up… In These Times  [Note: The Teamsters Union has national master agreements in the freight, warehouse, and passenger transportation industries, among others.]
Why Stronger Labor Unions Would Speed Up the U.S. Post-COVID Recovery
Oct. 22, 2020  | COMMENTARY | Recessions always inflict the most pain on Americans in the middle and lower end of the income distribution range, destroying jobs, eroding wages, and wiping out savings for those working in industries such as construction, manufacturing, hospitality, and retail. But the crushing economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have reached levels unseen in the last four decades, and the long-term scarring will be severe without intervention from Congress – not just in the form of emergency relief, but also with targeted policy solutions.  One solution lawmakers should prioritize is a historic workers’ rights proposal, given that defanged labor protections are a large part of the reason the downturn has been so devastating to those who can least afford it... Fortune
Workers Who Were Laid Off Say They Were Passed Over – for Their Own Jobs
Oct. 20, 2020 | JOBS | Like millions of Americans who lost their jobs during the pandemic, Jorge Padilla had hoped to work for many more years before the economic meltdown interrupted his plans. But in March, Padilla was laid off from his job as a banquet server in the Las Vegas area and even though his old company has ramped up hiring again, it hasn’t contacted him. Station Casinos, which owns the Green Valley Ranch Resort Spa and Casino where he worked for nine years, is making anyone who wants a job reapply and is hiring mostly lower-paid workers rather than longtime employees like him. “We worked hard for this company, and we were loyal for many years. Now it’s time for them to give us a chance to come back.” Labor unions agree, and as the bleak U.S. job situation shows no sign of a major revival, they are pushing for legislation to ensure that people who lost jobs in the pandemic get first dibs when those positions reopen. Such ordinances, known as Right to Recall or Right of Recall bills, have passed in cities and counties across the nation. A Baltimore city council committee approved one such bill in September, but it has not yet been signed by the mayor… Time







 
 
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