Site Map Icon
RSS Feed icon
 
 
 

Today in Labor History

JAN. 27, 1969
A group of Detroit African-American auto workers known as the Eldon Avenue Axle Plant Revolutionary Union Movement led a wildcat strike against racism and bad working conditions. They were critical of both automakers and the UAW (United Automobile Workers), condemning the seniority system and grievance procedures as racist.
Voices of Labor

Member Login
Username:

Password:


Not registered yet?
Click Here to sign-up

Forgot Your Login?
  Member Resources  
     
From Victories to Union Militancy, 5 Reasons for Workers to Celebrate This Labor Day
Posted On: Sep 02, 2019
Sept. 2, 2019 | WORKERS' RIGHTS | Labor Day often gets short shrift as a worker’s holiday. Marked primarily by sales on patio furniture and mattresses, the day also has a more muddled history than May Day, which stands for internationalism and solidarity among the working class. Labor Day, by contrast, was declared a federal holiday in 1894 by President Grover Cleveland, fresh off his administration’s violent suppression of the Pullman railroad strike. But Labor Day was first celebrated twelve years earlier when a coalition of socialists and labor activists organized a mass march in New York City calling for shorter hours, safer working conditions, increased pay and a labor holiday. On September 5, 1882, 10,000 people took to the streets of New York instead. That history, plus the simple fact that workers deserve more than one holiday, makes Labor Day worth celebrating. And this year, there are more reasons than usual for working people to rejoice… Working In These Times
 
 
Teamsters Local 992
Copyright © 2020, All Rights Reserved.
Powered By UnionActive™
Visit Unions-America.com!

Top of Page image